Trump’s Unwanted Presence In Philippines Met With Seriously Violent Protests (VIDEO)

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Throughout Trump’s 12-day Asia tour, most of the countries treated President Donald Trump’s arrivals with elaborate ceremonies. Granted, countries like China probably orchestrated every bit of the welcome he received.

via Youtube.

However, his arrival to the Philippines was a bit different. Despite a gala being held for his and Philippines’ President Rodrigo Duterte meeting, Trump was met by violent protests occurring outside along the street to the U.S. embassy. ABC reported:

‘Carrying placards declaring “Dump Trump” and “Down with US Imperialism”, the left-wing protesters were blocked by police in riot gear with shields and batons, and then showered with jets of water from a fire engine.’

MANILA, PHILIPPINES – NOVEMBER 12: Protesters are soaked as they clash with riot police while marching in the streets of Manila on the day of US President Trump’s arrival on November 12, 2017 in Manila, Philippines. Hundreds of Filipinos protested in Manila ahead of U.S. President Donald Trump’s arrival to the Philippines during his 12-day Asia trip. Protestors from left-wing groups chanted anti-U.S. slogans as Trump was set to visit to the Philippines over the weekend for the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) Summit, marking the last leg of his five-country Asian tour. (Photo by Jes Aznar/Getty Images)

One student called Trump:

‘…the CEO of the imperialist US Government.’

MANILA, PHILIPPINES – NOVEMBER 12: Protesters march in the streets of Manila on the day of US President Trump’s arrival on November 12, 2017 in Manila, Philippines. Hundreds of Filipinos protested in Manila ahead of U.S. President Donald Trump’s arrival to the Philippines during his 12-day Asia trip. Protestors from left-wing groups chanted anti-U.S. slogans as Trump was set to visit to the Philippines over the weekend for the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) Summit, marking the last leg of his five-country Asian tour. (Photo by Jes Aznar/Getty Images)

The Philippines is the last country Trump will visit in Asia before he heads back home to the White House.

Despite strained relations between the U.S. and the Philippines, Duterte stressed a need for friendship between the countries.

‘We have to be friends, the other hotheads would like us to confront China and the rest of the world on so many issues.’

Though that sounds wonderful, Duterte has expressed opinions that could be considered anti-U.S. One opinion he expressed was back in 2016 when he called President Barack Obama a “son of a whore.” Furthermore, Duterte once said he would force the United States to leave the Philippines. He said:

‘We do not need you. Prepare to leave the Philippines. Prepare for the eventual repeal or abrogation of the VFA.

‘Bye, bye America and [sic] work on the protocols that will eventually move you out of the Philippines.’

BEIJING, CHINA – MAY 15: Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte speaks to Chinese Premier Li Keqiang (not pictured) during their meeting at the Great Hall of the People on May 15, 2017 in Beijing, China. (Photo by Parker Song – Pool/Getty Images)

That was before Trump took office.

Let’s not forget Duterte called the ambassador to the Philippines a “gay son of a bitch.”

Actually, in all reality, Trump and Duterte sound like they could be the best of friends based on Duterte’s habit of saying whatever enters his mind.

Regardless, the people of the Philippines were not happy about Trump’s arrival.

MANILA, PHILIPPINES – NOVEMBER 12: Protesters march in the streets of Manila on the day of US President Trump’s arrival on November 12, 2017 in Manila, Philippines. Hundreds of Filipinos protested in Manila ahead of U.S. President Donald Trump’s arrival to the Philippines during his 12-day Asia trip. Protestors from left-wing groups chanted anti-U.S. slogans as Trump was set to visit to the Philippines over the weekend for the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) Summit, marking the last leg of his five-country Asian tour. (Photo by Jes Aznar/Getty Images)

If it’s any consolation to Filipinos, though, we aren’t happy about Trump coming back to the U.S. ourselves.

Featured image by Jes Aznar/Getty Images.

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