Trump Stabs Supporters DIRECTLY In The Back, Takes Back TOP Campaign Promise (DETAILS)

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The Affordable Care Act, better known as Obamacare, was one of President Obama’s most important policy initiatives. The law helped more than 20 million people receive insurance and fixed several problems within the health care industry. However, it is far from perfect, and the rising cost of health insurance led many to support the GOP’s call to repeal and replace the ACA.

Throughout the course of his campaign, Donald Trump railed against the system and vowed to repeal and replace it. However, since his election, Trump appears to have softened his tone a bit. During an appearance on 60 Minutes, Trump said that he would ensure that those with pre-existing conditions would still be able to buy insurance and promised that children would be able to remain on their parents’ plan for an extended period of time.

We’ll return to Trump’s back peddling in a moment, but first, there’s a bigger problem with his health care proposals than mere hypocrisy. The biggest problem with Trump’s plan is that it will not work. The two policies Trump cited are among the most popular parts of Obamacare, but they are only possible due to the most unpopular provision: the individual mandate.

Both Mitt Romney, who implemented a variant of the ACA in Massachusetts, and President Obama initially opposed the idea of an individual mandate, but the system is simply unworkable without a large pool of relatively healthy people to subsidize those who are sick.

Now we can return To Trump’s hypocrisy and, as is usually the case, it’s rather blatant. One of the biggest selling points of his campaign was that, as president, he would not be beholden to lobbyists or special interest groups. It’s great for the campaign trail, but, unfortunately, it doesn’t match up with the reality of the incoming Trump administration.

He made the rising cost of pharmaceuticals a major issue during his campaign, but his website’s health care page doesn’t mention the rising costs of drugs — though it does discuss changes to Medicare, Medicaid, and restrictions on abortion.

So why has Trump suddenly dropped such a major plank of his campaign platform? It’s probably because his transition team includes former executives from the pharmaceutical industry as well as major lobbying firms.

‘Other key figures in Trump’s circle of advisers have included a former executive at drugmakers Pfizer and Celgene and the chairman of Williams & Jensen, a Washington lobbying firm. According to federal reports, Williams and Jensen’s clients in recent years have included 11 of the world’s largest drugmakers, including Pfizer, Novartis, AstraZeneca, Merck, and Bayer.’

Additionally, the incoming vice-president, Mike Pence, has received millions of dollars from  Eli Lilly. In fact, the Indiana-based drug company is Pence’s third largest contributor.

Trump has talked a lot about taking on corruption and “draining the swamp,” but it is starting to look like the swamp will be drained right into the Oval Office.

For more information on the 60 Minutes interview, check out the video below:

Featured image via Getty Images.