Deep Red Alabama Stuns America; Republican Set Up To Lose Key Senate Seat

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President Trump campaigned hard for Senator Luther Strange to continue to fill the seat left vacant by Attorney General Jeff Sessions. However, it was ultimately Roy Moore, the anti-establishment Republican candidate, who took home the most votes in last month’s primary runoff election.

Now, a new poll from Fox News shows that Moore and Democrat Doug Jones are currently tied in the race to fill Sessions’ seat. Both candidates have 42 percent of the vote.

When just Alabama voters who are “extremely or very interested in the race” were polled, Jones actually came out ahead of Moore by one percentage point (46-45 percent).

Eleven percent of Alabamians said that they are still undecided.

The election will take place on December 12, so there’s still plenty of time for the polls to shift in either candidate’s favor. However, the fact that a Democrat is doing so well in Alabama — a state the Trump won by 28 points —  is surprising.

Republican pollster Daron Shaw said about the results of the poll:

‘This race exemplifies the difficulty the Republican Party has now.

‘There is an element of the party that has had it with the establishment, had it with politics as usual, had it with political correctness. The fissure within the party means divisive primaries, controversial candidates, and hard choices for GOP voters once the general election rolls around.’

The poll, which was released Tuesday, also showed that 42 percent of Moore’s supporters have some reservations about their candidate. Only 28 percent said the same about Jones.

At the same time, 21 percent of those who said they’re voting for Jones said they’re really voting against Moore. Only seven percent of Moore’s supporters said the same about Jones.

Moore’s supporters listed the following as their main reasons for backing him: party loyalty (41 percent) and his Christian beliefs (20 percent). Jones supporters cited party loyalty (35 percent) and their belief that Moore is extreme (32 percent) as their top reasons for supporting the Democratic candidate.

When voters are broken up by demographics, Moore beats Jones among white evangelical Christians (+51), white men without a college degree (+48), and gun owners (+16).

Jones leads Moore among black voters (+66), voters under age 45 (+14), and women (+3).

About one in 10 Trump voters have defected to vote for Jones (11 percent), and only four percent of Clinton voters are now supporting Moore.

Voters do not particularly see either Jones or Moore as a good fit for Alabama. Twenty-nine percent said Jones is too liberal for the state, and 39 percent said that Moore is “out of step” with the state. Of that group, 24 percent were Republicans.

Only three in 10 Alabama voters are pleased with the way the federal government is working these days.  Most voters are either angry (22 percent) or dissatisfied (45 percent).

The Fox News poll was conducted by telephone between October 14 and 16 under the joint direction of Anderson Robbins Research (D) and Shaw & Company Research (R). The poll questioned 801 registered Alabama voters and has a margin of error of +/- 3.5 percentage points for the total sample.

Image of Moore via Mark Wilson/Getty Images; image of Jones via Twitter