Trump Mocks New Zealand’s Female Prime Minister; She Shot Right Back, No Holds Barred

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Donald Trump has a real problem with women, especially strong women. He says he hits back 10 times harder, but this new woman on the scene gave him a knockout blow.

Trump traveled to Asia for 12 days and ended up at the East Asia Summit gala dinner, where he met New Zealand’s recently elected Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern. It was her first major international trip.

The two had talked by phone for about five minutes after she won in a surprise upset against her opponent.

WELLINGTON, NEW ZEALAND – OCTOBER 26: Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern makes a speech while partner Clarke Gayford looks on at Parliament following a swearing-in ceremony at Government House on October 26, 2017 in Wellington, New Zealand. After failing to win an outright majority in the general election on September 23, Labour entered into a coalition agreement with the New Zealand First and Greens parties. (Photo by Hagen Hopkins/Getty Images)

Ms. Ardern told The Telegraph she met Donald Trump at the East Asia Summit gala dinner, when Donald Trump patted the person next to him on the shoulder and said:

‘This lady caused a lot of upset in her country.’

WASHINGTON, DC – NOVEMBER 02: (AFP OUT) U.S. President Donald Trump gestures to reporters after joining Broadcom CEO Hock Tan in announcing the repatriation of Tan’s company headquarters to the United States from Singapore during a ceremony in the Oval Office of the White House, in Washington, DC, 11-2-17. At left is Rep. Kevin McCarthy (R-CA). (Photo by Martin H. Simon – Pool/Getty Images)

The prime minister just smile and told him, according to the Telegraph:

‘Well, you know, only maybe 40 per cent!’

Trump repeated his insult, but Ardern did not let him off of the hook, as so many do. She shot back:

‘You know, no one marched when I was elected. He laughed and it was only afterwards that I reflect that it could have been taken in a very particular way – he did not seem offended.’

New Zealand’s prime minister was referring to the Women’s March that occurred the day after Trump’s inauguration. It was with largest march in U.S. history.

AUCKLAND, NEW ZEALAND – OCTOBER 28: New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern meets people at the Sandringham street festival on October 28, 2017 in Auckland, New Zealand. Jacinda Ardern was sworn in as New Zealand’s 20th Prime Minister on Thursday and is the country’s youngest leader in more than 150 years. (Photo by Hannah Peters/Getty Images)

During their phone conversation, Trump had “genuinely been interested” in the prime minister’s election, she commented. The U.S. media had covered her election.

Earlier in November, Ardern said that the president was “consistent.”

The Prime Minister said:

‘He is the same person that you see behind the scenes as he is in the public or through the media.’

WELLINGTON, NEW ZEALAND – NOVEMBER 08: Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern makes a speech at Parliament on November 8, 2017 in Wellington, New Zealand. Labour leader Jacinda Ardern was sworn in on 26 October as the 40th Prime Minister of New Zealand. (Photo by Hagen Hopkins/Getty Images)

When asked whether that was a good thing, she replied:

‘I think being consistent – there is something in that.’

The trip gave her a chance to articulate her vision for the world. She told The Newsroom:

‘I’ve always known that to be true, but to see it enforced in these forums…is a real testament to the work that’s been done before, and the work all year round that our representatives do.’

Ardern spoke out about nuclear non-proliferation, according to the Newsroom:

‘We have been strong advocates on issues like nuclear non-proliferation and that is as relevant now as it’s ever been, particularly when it comes to the Korean peninsula, and so playing a role in being consistent advocates, particularly from a position of always taking a really principled stance I think is important.’

WELLINGTON, NEW ZEALAND – OCTOBER 31: Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern speaks while Minister for Economic Development David Parker looks on during a post cabinet press conference at Parliament on October 31, 2017 in Wellington, New Zealand. Labour leader Jacinda Ardern was sworn in on 26 October as the 40th Prime Minister of New Zealand. After failing to win an outright majority in the general election on September 23, Labour entered into a coalition agreement with the New Zealand First and Greens parties. (Photo by Hagen Hopkins/Getty Images)

Ardern was very concerned about climate change:

‘I wasn’t the only one [talking about climate change], but there weren’t many of us, and I do think it’s an issue that needs consistent advocacy because in some of those forums there’s an absence of the groups that are directly affected, but the overall Asia-Pacific will feel its impact hugely and yet have some of the most deprived populations in the world as well.’

She noted that the U.S. took a step back from the “geopolitical climate” and China “filled the void.”

‘I think it’s in our interest for us to have an engaged China and an engaged United States in our region, that’s in our interests. Now they may choose to do that through different architecture, but as long as it’s open and transparent, then that’s going to always be our guiding principles.’

WELLINGTON, NEW ZEALAND – NOVEMBER 07: Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern shakes hands with Chief Justice, Dame Sian Elias, during a ceremony at Government House on November 7, 2017 in Wellington, New Zealand. Trevor Mallard has been elected as Speaker of the House after Labour leader Jacinda Ardern was sworn in on 26 October as the 40th Prime Minister of New Zealand. (Photo by Hagen Hopkins/Getty Images)

Featured Image via Getty Images.

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