Law To End Electoral College For Good Finds Its Way To Paper

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If the electoral college was gone or detoured around, Hillary Clinton had the popular vote by three million votes and would have won the presidential election in 2016. A person’s vote counts in districts where the vote can be excruciatingly close. A person’s vote can flip a state red or blue. Unfortunately, there is something called the Electoral College, but it may be on its way into oblivion — finally.

An election means one-man (or woman)-one-vote, right? No. A person’s vote elects a member to the Electoral College, and they vote for the candidate at the party’s national convention — usually. However, it is not a requirement to vote as the state voters wished.

Colorado Governor Jared Polis (D) intends to sign a measure that converts electoral votes to popular votes or one-person-one-vote. The nation supports ridding itself of the Electoral College, which has no place in an era of a 24-hour news cycle and the internet.

Polis said the electoral college was an “undemocratic relic” in his interview with The Hill:. 

‘I’ve long supported electing the president by who gets the most votes,” Polis told The Hill. “It’s a way to move towards direct election of the president.”

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This means that Colorado will be the 12th state in the National Popular Vote interstate compact. So far, those states and the District of Columbia make up 172 Electoral College votes. When the number of states make up 270 of the electoral votes, it has always been enough to move a candidate into the White House.

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When the states reach 270 electoral votes, they will move the compact into effect: one-person-one-vote. Then, the coalition gives their electoral votes in total to whichever presidential candidate “wins the national popular vote.”

Chair of National Popular Vote John Koza, which supports the “interstate compact” said:

‘Under a national popular vote, the 38 non-battleground states long ignored by presidential campaigns will be powerful again, because no candidate can win 270 electoral votes and the White House without also winning the popular vote across all 50 states and the District of Columbia.’

A minimum of 11 more states have passed their popular vote bills beyond at least one chamber of their legislatures. This means that their 89 electoral votes could possibly pass their other chamber, then be added to the compact. Then, the compact would be only nine votes from reaching the 270 goal.

Six states won the election for Trump over Hillary Clinton: “Florida, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Virginia and Michigan.” Twelve more contributed to the election. Twenty-four red and blue states were completely left out of the results.

The Colorado’s state Senate was the first to pass a popular vote bill back in 2006. Unfortunately, the compact did not pass the state’s House.

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At this point, almost all of the states that have become members of the compact have been bright blue. A few red states have passed this measure through either their state Senate or state House. Those red states are: “Arkansas, Arizona, and Oklahoma.” Purple states have done the same: Michigan and North Carolina.

Republicans generally have far fewer voters than Democrats, so they do not want to do anything that would lose them votes.

National Popular Vote wrote on its website that the National Popular Vote interstate compact would guarantee the Presidency to the candidate who receives the most popular votes in all 50 states and the District of Columbia:

‘The Only States That Received Any Attention in the 2012 General-Election Campaign For President Were States Within 3% of the National Outcome.’

Featured image is a screenshot via YouTube.