Democrats Open New Trump/Mueller Investigation

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Donald Trump lies every day and has for the past 1032 days. By day 993 in office, he had told 13,435 lies, according to The Politico Magazine. That comes out to 13 1/2 lies every single day on average. Based upon that, did POTUS lie to former Special Counsel Robert Mueller III?

The House of Representatives has been looking into whether the president lied to former special counsel. The House general counsel appeared before a federal appeals court in Washington, D.C. Monday.

Since the Mueller Report was completed, the House has been exerting pressure to obtain Mueller’s investigative materials from Attorney General William Barr.

General Counsel Douglas Letter said, according to The Washington Post:

‘Did the president lie? Was the president not truthful in his responses to the Mueller investigation. The House is trying to determine whether the current president should remain in office. This is unbelievably serious and it’s happening right now, very fast.’

Next, Letter referred to Trump’s longtime adviser Roger Stone who was convicted in a juried trial for lying to Congress and witness tampering. Letter also referenced the president’s personal attorney Michael Cohen who was in jail for lying to Congress. He considered this as reflecting an urgent need for the House Judiciary Committee to review the Mueller grand jury testimony, evidence, and other materials. he said:

‘We have at least two people who have already been convicted of lying to Congress. And what are they lying about? They’re lying about things that go directly to the Mueller report.’

The general counselor continued:

‘There is evidence, very sadly, that the president might have provided untruthful answers. [The matter was of] immense [importance and] a key part of the impeachment inquiry.’

The department called former Democratic Senate Judiciary Committee counsel and a 2010 nominee of President Barack Obama, Chief U.S. District Judge Beryl Howell for the District of Columbia’s order in its appeal:

‘[A]n extraordinary abrogation of grand-jury secrecy: not only are the materials at issue squarely protected … but some relate to ongoing criminal investigations or prosecutions.’

House attorneys told the appeals court in written findings that the legislators needed to review the materials:

‘[To] aid the House in determining whether the President committed impeachable offenses, including attempted obstruction of the Special Counsel’s investigation of Russian interference in the 2016 Presidential election and solicitation of Ukrainian interference in the 2020 Presidential election.’

Howell wrote a 75-page opinion, which said the Judiciary Committee and the House were serving as a grand jury as they determined whether to suggest articles of impeachment:

‘In carrying out the weighty constitutional duty of determining whether impeachment of the President is warranted, Congress need not redo the nearly two years of effort spent on the Special Counsel’s investigation, nor risk being misled by witnesses, who may have provided information to the grand jury and the Special Counsel that varies from what they tell.’

Howell rejected the Justice Department’s claims the House had not used subpoenas to exhaust all other ways of obtaining the information:

‘These arguments smack of farce [referencing letter from White House counsel Pat Cipollone to the House].’

She wrote that this told the House that the administration had no intention of complying with the impeachment inquiry:

‘The reality is that DOJ and the White House have been openly stonewalling the House’s efforts to get information by subpoena and by agreement, and the White House has flatly stated that the Administration will not cooperate with congressional requests for information.’

The Mueller Report Adventures: In Bite-Sizes on this Facebook page. These quick, two-minute reads interpret the report in normal English for busy people. Mueller Bite-Sizes uncovers what is essentially a compelling spy mystery. Interestingly enough, Mueller Bite-Sizes can be read in any order.