Lisa Page Breaks 2-Yrs Of Silence On Trump’s Gut-Punching Attacks

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Former FBI attorney Lisa Page went from virtual obscurity to blast onto Donald Trump’s radar. Like a bulldog with a bone, this president grabbed her at the back of her neck and shook her onto the world stage. She has waited for him to tire of tormenting her, but after two years, this attorney decided to speak out to defend herself.

POTUS has had no qualms about attacking career government employees. He calls them “the deep state,” when in reality, those encased in the bubble around Trump live in the swamp of corruption.

On December 9th, the Department of Justice’s (DOJ) inspector general may exonerate the FBI from Trump’s claims that the FBI spied on his 2016 campaign. The report could exonerate Page, too. POTUS alleged that she was biased against him and acted “unprofessionally.”

So what made Page decide to speak out after nearly two years of silence? She told The Daily Beast in an exclusive interview that she could not remain quiet after Trump faked her orgasm on his rally stage. POTUS made even his followers uncomfortable. Page said:

‘Honestly, his demeaning fake orgasm was really the straw that broke the camel’s back,” she says. The president called out her name as he acted out an orgasm in front of thousands of people at a Minneapolis rally on Oct. 11.

‘I had stayed quiet for years hoping it would fade away, but instead it got worse. It had been so hard not to defend myself, to let people who hate me control the narrative. I decided to take my power back.’

Page would have stayed behind the scene had Trump not thrust her into the public. The attorney said she believed her texts to Peter Strzok were not too political. They were about work and family. She said:

‘At the end of July in 2017, I am informed by the DOJ Inspector General’s Office that I’m under investigation for political text messages and honestly, I have no idea what they’re talking about. I have no recollection. And initially they’re very coy about it. They don’t tell me much about it. I don’t have the first clue what they’re talking about. What I do know is that my text messages will reveal that I had previously had an affair. I’m overwhelmed by dread and embarrassment at the prospect that OIG investigators, Andy, and my colleagues, now know or could learn about this deeply personal secret.’

Page went on to say that the “most wrong thing I’ve ever done” went public. That was also when Trump began Twitter-attacking her:

‘So now I have to deal with the aftermath of having the most wrong thing I’ve ever done in my life become public. And that’s when I become the source of the president’s personal mockery and insults. Because before this moment in time, there’s not a person outside of my small legal community who knows who I am or what I do. I’m a normal public servant, just a G-15, standard-level lawyer, like every other lawyer at the Justice Department.’

Trump’s attacks have never let up, and the attorney said:

‘I mean, he tweeted about me four days ago. When Roger Stone got convicted, he asked, why isn’t Page in jail too? Not to mention, you know, his truly reprehensible, degrading stunt at his rally, in which he used my name to simulate an orgasm. And I don’t ever know when the president’s going to attack next. And when it happens, it can still sort of upend my day. You don’t really get used to it.’

This was how she described Trump’s Twitter attacks:

‘It’s almost impossible to describe” what it’s like. It’s like being punched in the gut. My heart drops to my stomach when I realize he has tweeted about me again. The president of the United States is calling me names to the entire world. He’s demeaning me and my career. It’s sickening.

‘But it’s also very intimidating because he’s still the president of the United States. And when the president accuses you of treason by name, despite the fact that I know there’s no fathomable way that I have committed any crime at all, let alone treason, he’s still somebody in a position to actually do something about that. To try to further destroy my life. It never goes away or stops, even when he’s not publicly attacking me.’

By February 2016, she was working on the Hillary Clinton email case:

‘It was horrible. It was a devastating moment at the FBI. It was like a funeral, only worse, because at least when someone dies, you get to come together and celebrate and talk about that person. He was still alive. But he was inaccessible to us. It jolted the ranks and the investigation. It was so abrupt. He was there one day and gone the next.’

The Mueller Report Adventures: In Bite-Sizes on this Facebook page. These quick, two-minute reads interpret the report in normal English for busy people. Mueller Bite-Sizes uncovers what is essentially a compelling spy mystery. Interestingly enough, Mueller Bite-Sizes can be read in any order.