Trump Suffers Massive Emotional Collapse After SCOTUS Defeat

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This Thursday, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that Manhattan authorities could access President Donald Trump’s tax returns as part of an investigation into the Trump Organization. The ruling was 7-2, with both of Trump’s nominees to the bench, including Neil Gorsuch and Brett Kavanaugh, among those who ruled against the president. The ruling capped off years of battling over the president’s financial records, which he’s refused to release, despite decades of precedent of presidential candidates voluntarily doing so. President Trump promptly freaked out after the Supreme Court ruling, with a meltdown of six tweets and counting.

Within an hour of the court’s Manhattan case ruling, Trump ignorantly tweeted:

‘The Supreme Court sends case back to Lower Court, arguments to continue. This is all a political prosecution. I won the Mueller Witch Hunt, and others, and now I have to keep fighting in a politically corrupt New York. Not fair to this Presidency or Administration!.. Courts in the past have given ā€œbroad deferenceā€. BUT NOT ME!’

In reality, in the ruling, Chief Justice John Roberts, who is an appointee of George W. Bush, outlined how there are literal hundreds of years of legal precedent outlining how the president is not exempt from basic legal standards like complying with subpoenas. Trump had sued his accounting firm and the Manhattan district attorney in an effort to keep the accounting firm from complying with the Manhattan subpoena for his tax returns, but as Roberts explained, Trump’s not going to get special treatment.

Roberts wrote:

‘Article II and the Supremacy Clause do not categorically preclude, or require a heightened standard for, the issuance of a state criminal subpoena to a sitting President… In 1807, John Marshall, presiding as Circuit Justice for Virginia over the treason trial of Aaron Burr, granted Burrā€™s motion for a subpoena duces tecum directed at President Jefferson… In the two centuries since Burr, successive Presidents from Monroe to Clinton have accepted Marshallā€™s ruling that the Chief Executive is subject to subpoena and have uniformly agreed to testify when called in criminal proceedings.’

As Roberts noted, in that original 1807 case in which the question of subpoenas targeting sitting presidents came up, those on the president’s side had argued that the president’s “duties as chief magistrate demand his whole time for national objects” — but at the time, the judge ruled that those duties were not so overwhelming as to prohibit compliance with a subpoena. The same applies to Trump.

After all of the above, Trump tweeted what looked like a pre-prepared statement condemning the Supreme Court ruling. (Perhaps he was expecting to lose.) The four-tweet statement, all of which went up at about the same time, included lengthy complaints about the supposed injustice of a demand for him to comply with basic legal precedent while his political opponents remained free. Trump has accused those opponents, including Obama, Biden, and others, of imaginary crimes.

Check out Twitter’s response to the president below:

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