‘The Economist’ Makes Election-Influencing 2020 Endorsement

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Donald Trump is in a very bad mood, and it is about to get worse. He rides his stick horse all around the economy, touting his “great” accomplishments. At the same time, leaves behind older Americans and children shivering in his freezing Nebraska wake. Then, he waves his dark-magic wand over a MAGA (Make America Great Again) hat and pulls out a dead rabbit.

The Economist magazine endorsed his opponent former Vice President Joe Biden. Why would the publication do that? The sitting president has been “destructive” for four years, but a second term would affirm “all his worst instincts.” The Economist called Biden “his antithesis.” Its subheadings tell it all: “King Donald” and “President Joe:”

‘THE COUNTRY that elected Donald Trump in 2016 was unhappy and divided. The country he is asking to re-elect him is more unhappy and more divided. After almost four years of his leadership, politics is even angrier than it was and partisanship even less constrained.’

It continued, pointing at the “almost 230,000” coronavirus deaths:

Daily life is consumed by a pandemic that has registered almost 230,000 deaths amid bickering, buck-passing, and lies. Much of that is Mr Trump’s doing, and his victory on November 3rd would endorse it all.’

The magazine wrote that “‘Donald Trump has desecrated the values that make America a beacon to the world:”

‘BREAKING: The Economist endorses Joe Biden. They say Trump “has desecrated the values that make America a beacon to the world.” While Biden “would enter the White House with the promise of the most precious gift that democracies can bestow: renewal.”’

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Joe Biden is not perfect, but “he is a good man.” He would also be “putting a fractured country back together again.” Unlike the Trump Humpty Dumpty fracturing, healing America is still possible, so far:

‘[He is not] miracle cure for what ails America. But he is a good man who would restore steadiness and civility to the White House. He is equipped to begin the long, difficult task of putting a fractured country back together again. That is why, if we had a vote, it would go to Joe.’

Things were going well in the economy for conservative Republicans before the coronavirus pandemic hit Trump and uncovered a whole warren of rat holes beneath the so-called leader of the free world:

‘[O]ur bigger dispute with Mr Trump is over something more fundamental. In the past four years he has repeatedly desecrated the values, principles and practices that made America a haven for its own people and a beacon to the world. Those who accuse Mr Biden of the same or worse should stop and think. Those who breezily dismiss Mr Trump’s bullying and lies as so much tweeting are ignoring the harm he has wrought.’

The Economist made no bones about it. Trump stoked racial tension, and now “40 percent of the country thinks the other 60 percent is “evil:”

‘Mr Trump made it [toxic partisanship] central to his office. He has never sought to represent the majority of Americans who did not vote for him. Faced by an outpouring of peaceful protest after the killing of George Floyd, his instinct was not to heal, but to depict it as an orgy of looting and left-wing violence—part of a pattern of stoking racial tension. Today, 40% of the electorate believes the other side is not just misguided, but evil.

The publication wrote about misguided “Wavering Republicans:”

‘Wavering Republicans worry that Mr Biden, old and weak, would be a Trojan horse for the hard left. It is true that his party’s radical wing is stirring, but he and Kamala Harris, his vice-presidential pick, have both shown in the campaign that they can keep it in check.’

Yet, The Economist  said that going with Biden would help down-ballot “moderate centrist” Democrats, like “Steve Bullock in Montana or Barbara Bollier in Kansas:”

‘Ordinarily, voters might be advised to constrain the left by ensuring that the Senate remained in Republican hands. Not this time. A big win for the Democrats there would add to the preponderance of moderate centrists over radicals in Congress by bringing in senators like Steve Bullock in Montana or Barbara Bollier in Kansas. You would not see a lurch to the left from either of them.’

Twitter world went wild when they saw this tweet. Take a look at some of our favorite responses below:

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