Washington Passes Law Restoring Voting Rights For Felons & Parolees

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Welcome to Bidenville. Everywhere we look, there are sparks of kindness and of fairness sparking through the atmosphere, colored red, blue, and purple. This is the beginning of a better America than President Biden left when he was President Barack Obama’s vice president in 2017.

The new president understands, perhaps better than many, that the leader of this great nation sets the tone for the entire country. After four years of cruelty, lies, and the enemies lists.

Wednesday night, the state of Washington passed a bill that would automatically restore voting rights “for people on parole and probation,” according to The Axios.

Governor Jay Inslee (D-WA) will be signing the bill. It will make certain every Washingtonian will be able to vote, unless they were incarcerated.

Governor Ralph Northam (D-VA) restored 69,000 former felon’s voting rights on Tuesday. He used executive action. This while Republican-led states have been frantically passing hundreds of bills to restrict voter rights into law.

Deputy Director of the Voting Rights and Elections Program at the Brennan Center for Justice at NYU Law, Sean Morales-Doyle. released a statement calling this “a step towards racial justice in voting:”

‘Due to the racial disparities in the state’s criminal justice system, Washington’s Black residents are four times more likely than others to be disenfranchised.’

He continued, noting that this happened “without amazing co-conspirators:”

Just passed my first bill off the Senate Floor! Off to the Governor’s desk and couldn’t have done it without amazing co-conspirators from the ground up to the halls of the #waleg! So much love for my people tonight!! #FreeTheVote @senpattykuderer’

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The National Conference of State Legislators( NCSL) showed how the states shook out on this issue:

  • ‘In the District of Columbia, Maine and Vermont, felons never lose their right to vote, even while they are incarcerated.
  • In 18 states, felons lose their voting rights only while incarcerated, and receive automatic restoration upon release.
  • In 19 states, felons lose their voting rights during incarceration, and for a period of time after, typically while on parole and/or probation. Voting rights are automatically restored after this time period. Former felons may also have to pay any outstanding fines, fees or restitution before their rights are restored as well.
  • In 11 states felons lose their voting rights indefinitely for some crimes, or require a governor’s pardon in order for voting rights to be restored, face an additional waiting period after completion of sentence (including parole and probation) or require additional action before voting rights can be restored.’

Twitter world went wild. Take a look at some of our favorite responses below:

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