Ukraine Democracy Fighters Destroy 30 Russian Aircraft At Once

0
1017

Ukrainian defenders are taking credit for wiping some 30 Russian helicopters off the map in rapid succession at an airfield around the city of Kherson, which has been captured — for now — by invading Russian forces. Journalist Michael Weiss shared remarks from an officer with Ukraine’s military intelligence service confirming the hit; as that officer put it, “Yesterday, [Russia] lost 30 helicopters in the vicinity of Kherson where our marines destroyed them. The government announced this. Frankly speaking, it’s true.” Overall, Ukrainian forces say that they’ve taken 82 Russian helicopters and counting out of commission for the invading forces, and other apparently successful hits for the Ukrainians defending their country include a Russian warship.

Battlefield-related numbers are obviously difficult to conclusively confirm under current conditions, but the high totals of apparent Russian losses suggest that the invading forces may have been insufficiently prepared for the scope of Ukrainian resistance. That’s not to say that Ukrainians haven’t already suffered devastating impacts — thousands of civilians have died, and this Wednesday, Russian military personnel struck a maternity hospital in Mariupol, which had apparent patients or at least groups of people within its walls at the time. In Mariupol, hundreds of thousands of essentially trapped residents have been struggling under Russian attacks, having already lost access to utilities such as running water, and over 1,100 in the city have already died, according to the deputy mayor. Ukrainian Foreign Affairs Minister Dmytro Kuleba said on Wednesday that “Russia continues holding hostage over 400.000 people in Mariupol, blocks humanitarian aid and evacuation. Indiscriminate shelling continues. Almost 3.000 newborn babies lack medicine and food.”

The United States has announced a ban on Russian energy imports, further spiking the worldwide push to economically hold the country’s regime accountable for the unfolding violence in Ukraine. Over 2 million people have fled Ukraine as refugees, and efforts to secure further civilian evacuations from, for instance, Mariupol have been seriously hampered by repeated Russian violations of limited ceasefire agreements that had been set up. Negotiations between Russian and Ukrainian teams — neither of which have included the respective countries’ heads-of-state — have produced limited results, with Putin and his regime so far opting to stand by the violence, which they’re trying to gloss over with propaganda. Russian authorities have even implemented new legal provisions providing for prison sentences of up to 15 years for certain instances of spreading so-called fake news related to the war, and thousands of demonstrators in Russia against the conflict have been arrested.