Jim Jordan Deals Major Blow To His Own Party’s Sham House Investigations

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Recently, Republicans have been making an absolutely massive deal about bribery allegations ostensibly implicating the Bidens, particularly the president and his son Hunter. The massive problem here is that there remains no credible evidence establishing this claimed scheme that they’re publicizing actually existed.

And guess what? Republicans themselves are, at least in certain, specific contexts, admitting as much. Rep. Jim Jordan (R-Ohio), who leads the House Judiciary Committee in this Congress, recently acknowledged the lack of verification for the actual existence of alleged audio tapes corroborating the allegations against Biden. “I have no reason to doubt anything Senator Grassley says, but I don’t know if they exist or not,” Jordan admitted, referring to the alleged recordings.

Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) helped publicize the notion there could be audio recordings. Leading members of Congress evidently viewed a different version of an official document outlining the allegations than what the other members of the House Oversight Committee saw, and that second version allegedly redacted references to the claimed recordings. Yet, Grassley himself has admitted there are gaps. “I don’t even know where they are. I just know they exist, because of what the report says. Now, maybe they don’t exist. But how will I know until the FBI tells us, are they showing us their work?” Grassley said in a CNN discussion.

It is frankly ridiculous for Republicans from the Senate to the House to try and get so much mileage out of allegations they themselves sometimes admit might be completely bogus. Their promotion of the story of these allegations lends them inherent credibility in the minds of many, and they can’t reasonably pretend otherwise. The alleged bribery doesn’t even make sense, because as it apparently went, Biden was allegedly bribed into opposing a then-top prosecutor in Ukraine… who was already broadly opposed as a general matter of policy across Western governments.