GOP Governor Banned From Native American Reservation After Spreading Hate

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South Dakota GOP Governor Kristi Noem was banned from lands of a Native American tribe partially encompassed by her state after antagonistic commentary related to the southern border (of the U.S.) in comments to state legislators.

The development was relayed by a statement shared publicly this week from Oglala Sioux Tribe President Frank Star Comes Out. “We are older than South Dakota! Due to the safety of the Oyate, effective immediately, you are hereby Banished from the homelands of the Oglala Sioux Tribe!” the tribal leader’s statement says, directly addressing the GOP governor. Oyate is a word that means people (in the collective, communal sense) or nation.

Star Comes Out also took issue with accusations from Noem of involvement by a so-called “gang” known as the Ghost Dancers with foreign criminal organizations distributing dangerous drugs and perpetrating violence. “I and the Oyate are deeply offended that you alleged the “Ghost Dancers” are affiliated with these cartels,” the tribal leader said. He also pointed to the distribution of drugs occurring without usage of Native American lands — areas that Noem singled out as allegedly utilized in the process of spreading these substances.

Star Comes Out, a veteran of the U.S. Marines, ultimately accused Noem of playing electoral politics. He also pointed repeatedly to the opening for action by the federal government — somewhere that Republicans are currently in the process of what looks like sinking a bipartisan deal on the border and immigration recently presented in the Senate after extensive negotiations. GOP leadership in the House has asserted they won’t even bring the proposed legislative package to a vote. The deal would provide the federal government with new powers to largely close the border in certain, strenuous conditions and would also set up new aid for Ukraine and Israel — which Republicans are also effectively sinking as they complain about a sweeping immigration bill supposedly not going far enough.